Jump to content

Fren Banklin

Member
  • Content Count

    13
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by Fren Banklin

  1. nLite

    http://www.nliteos.com/

    Description: nLite is a tool for permanent Windows components removal and pre-installation Windows setup. After removal there is an option to make bootable image ready for burning on cd or testing in virtual machines. With nLite you will be able to have Windows installation which on install doesn't include, or even contain on cd, unwanted components.

    Verdict for nLite: Blacklisted - Wreaklessly strips out services and other required files; causing numerous issues with every release. This program will also modify files on your hard drive. It has been reported by numerous users that nLite "modifies every Windows installation file, even if you didn't modify anything related to that file. It will add "nLite" to the bottom of the file."

    I've used nLite for years. It's a reputable program, and very useful. It doesn't do anything that the User (i.e. YOU) does not want it to do. You pick what XP features you want, and exclude those you don't. Such as the stupid "OOBE (Out of Box Experience)" you have to sit through everytime you reinstall. There are many, many other useless features that can be removed/turned off etc...

    So if a person doesn't like what nLite has "done" to their system, they have no one but themselves to blame, as nLite only does what you tell it to do. nLite is also very well supported; it's creator is a constant presence of the nLite forum and has personally answered at least one of my questions on that forum.

    nLite has another useful feature for "slipstreaming" Service Packs. For example, if your original disk was an XP SP1, you can slipstream the standalone version of SP3 into a custom-created installation CD and save yourself the time of downloading and installing (and rebooting) SP3 after the New Install. You can also slipstream drivers into the installation disk, so if your hardware does not have drivers included in the standard XP Drivers, you can import them into the installation disk so that you do not have to "Press F6" during the installation process, and then use (only) a 3 1/2 floppy disk to import the drivers (no other media will work, which is highly annoying).

    I'm sure there are other positives to mention, I'm just a User and have no particular expertise. It's just a useful tool for people that mess with computers on a regular basis.

    Frankly I'm surprised that a forum that is associated with such a great tool such as dial-a-fix and the really informative lunarsoft wiki on XP Installation disks is not an enthusiastic supporter of nLite, much less having it "blacklisted". I was so surprised I had to look around to see if this forum as an alternative definition for the word "blacklisted", perhaps it means that it's really good. But no, it seems blacklisted means bad, and I find that really surprising. Perhaps nLite should be looked at a second time, or failing that, an alternative that performs the same functions in a better manner be recommended.

  2. Yet another update:

    Okay, so after successfully completing the O/S install, I go to Windows Update and it wants to do a Validation check. I decided not to do this, instead I manually changed the registry entry mentioned in the previous post with the original Product ID/Channel ID. Then used an older version of "Magic Jelly Bean" to change the product key from the "one size fits all" corporate key to the original key I got prior to the Repair Install. (Later versions of MJB do not have the "Change Product Key" tool.)

    Seemed like it went well, so I browsed back to Windows Update and -

    Guess What ? No Validation Required.

    Downloaded all 50+ updates and installed them just fine. So the immediate issue of this particular machine is resolved, but the larger questions remain. Why would all the legit information fail, the "pirate" data succeed and then once booted to desktop, the O/S can then be manually changed back to "legitimate" ?

  3. An update:

    After the successful install of the Volume License XP Pro Installation disk, I notice that the product key being reported in HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current Version is:

    Product ID 55274-645-6440716-23162

    Odd thing is, the installation disk's setupp.ini file reports:

    Pid=55274270

    How does a Product ID of 55274 with a channel ID of 270, get changed to a channel ID of 645 ? This indicates to me that the channel ID being reported in the registry sometimes may not be the one needed in the \I386 folder of the installation disk.

    The cause of all my problems.

    Is there an explanation for this ? Is there a way to take a Channel ID from the registry and definatively know what the Channel ID of an installation disk should be ?

    If not, should I just have defaulted to a volume license channel ID from the start ?

    How likely is it going to be that manually changing the product ID and product key to their originals is going to work, i.e. pass Microsoft's activation & validation. Getting updates is important.

  4. I have a mostly working machine that was a bit flaky so I decided to run a repair install. When I went to input the Product Key (that was used on the previous install and reported by Magic Jelly Bean), the installation refuses the Product Key.

    I've tried at least 6 different disks and all have failed. I'm waiting for the 7th to complete as I type this.

    Here's the Product ID information:

    Product ID: 76487-OEM-0012031-51200

    This number was taken directly from the computer's registry, per the instructions on lunarsoft's wiki.

    The wiki lists 5 different possible disks:

    76487 : XP Media Center Edition 2005

    76487 : XP Pro Royalty OEM ‡

    76487 : XP Pro SP2 (retail)

    76487 : XP Pro SP3 (OEM)

    76487 : XP Pro volume license (with '640' channel ID)

    I know the install isn't a Media Center edition. There is no Certificate of Authenticity on the case, so I can't rule out the other 4 possiblities. To make certain of success, I've labled the disks correctly.

    So far I've tried:

    PID 76487OEM from a disk VX2PFPP_EN with SP2

    PID 76487000 from a disk VX2PFPP_EN with SP2

    PID 76487OEM from a disk GRTMPOEM_WN with SP3

    I've tried others, but only started documenting the last 3.

    <break>

    OK, the last attempt succeeded. I used a corporate volume disk that worked.

    Odd thing is, the Product ID information from the disk that worked is nothing like what was in the registry originally. Here's what worked:

    [Pid]

    ExtraData=786F687170637175716954806365EF

    Pid=55274270

    The plan is to now change the registry information to reflect the previous (and legal) installation.

    I've spent about 2 days on this. Am I missing something obvious ?

  5. I find "dude" offensive. People that use it are young, and I am not. Being called "dude" by someone younger (and presumably dumber) is disrespectful. I'm not your peer. You are young, have much to learn and first of these things is respect. To call me "dude" reduces me to your level, which offends me.

    The abbreviated text is aggravating. This is not texting, and I am not 16. You can do your text language with your peers, and talk about all sorts of stuff I have no interest in. When mature adults use it, I immediately think of them as immature, and somehow wishing that they were 16 again. They're not. Instead they are ridiculous, like a very mature woman walking around with a pierced navel and a denim mini-skirt. Pathetic.

    Also, typing in ALL CAPS conveys the idea that one is stupid to the point of retardation. So to, typing in nothing but lowercase is annoying, as if the personality behind the words is weak, feeble and barely capable of creating thought, much less expressing it. I put almost as much effort into reading all lowercase text as the person that created did, which is to so almost no effort at all.

    I appreciate the mind that take the time to use proper grammar, syntax, spelling etc... It conveys the idea that they care enough about making effective communication that they are willing to put a little extra effort into making it as clear as possible. I read this kind of text closely. Good, functional minds frequently have something to say that is worth paying attention to, while retarded people generally say things that are best ignored.

    Which is not to say there is any justification in going "over the top" over spelling errors, etc... Writers/creators time has value, and some posts are just not worth meticulously grooming them to perfection. Effort was made by a good and functional mind to convey ideas that are worth paying attention to. These minds have other things to do and it reduces (in my opinion) the impact of the picece if it seems to be "over-crafted". If you raise the standards of the text too high, freuently the quality of the messages and meanings conveyed by those words falls short of expectations. Like that word right there. You aren't stupid. You know what I meant. Why should I was my time backing up and spelling the word "frequently" perfectly. Have I not demonstrated my intelligence thus far ? If not, there's nothing I can do that will, so why bother.

    This last point is obvious to me, as well as to other thinking people. Less intelligent, less rational people with difficulty maintaining balance and perspective have problems with minor spelling/gramatical errors. It's as if they lack the requisite intelligence to take issue with (or even understand) the meanins that are being conveyed; the best they can achieve is to nit-pick the manner in which those meanings are conveyed in order to achieve some illusion of adequacy.

  6. Not sure. I know I started at TackTech looking at "Known XP Labels". I do a lot of repairs on Dells, which frequently do not have reinstallation disks, and I think it is criminal (i.e. FRAUD) that Dell sells them the Operating System, doesn't provide the customer with a reinstallation disk and the wants to charge them $25 for a disk that costs 50 cents to make.

    Discovered Lunarsoft's wiki on how to modify the setupp.ini file to fool the O/S into thinking the product key is the correct one for the O/S disk. Since then I've learned quite a bit and have gotten better and making disks to repair broken machines.

    Also, was not surprised to see the Dial-a-Fix/Lunarsoft connection. I got the DAF from a tech at Tech Support Forum. We were trading favorite software/repair utilities. DAF and Autoruns are my favorites. HDD Regenerator is my latest/new favorite discovery.

    Anyways, DAF is really useful software. I suspect it could do MORE sometimes. What exactly I'm not sure.

  7. Matching workable XP installation disks with broken machines is my interest. I don't know where else to put the topic, if it's better somewhere else, please move.

    On the wiki, it descrives the Microsoft Product Code (MPC) with the letters "XXXXX", and the Channel ID as "YYY". Then there's the "ZZZZ...." codes, and nothing is said about them.

    I'm looking at a registry entry right now on a machine that needs a Repair Install/In Place Upgrade. hklm\software\microsoft\windows nt\currentversion

    Has a registry entry "ProductID" as "555274-640-0426986-23489"

    I know that "555274" is the Product Code and "640" is the channel ID. What I want to know is what the remaining numbers are in the code (the "ZZZ..." numbers), what they are used for and should I incorporate them into the custom XP disk I am creating in order to do the Repair Installation.

    Also, I'm not sure what the wiki means when it says that the "640, 641, 642..." channel ID's are for volume licensing and that they are somehow "created" by the channel CID of 270.

    Here's the link:

    http://wiki.lunarsof...iki/Product_IDs

    And here's the quote:

    Quote

    640 through 652 : Volume License (usually generated via 270 CID in setupp.ini)

    In general, what's the relationship between the codes in the setupp.ini file, and the registry entry: hklm\software\microsoft\windows nt\currentversion\ProductID ?

    I get the idea that only the MPC and CID are relevant, the volume label MIGHT be relevant which sort of implies that everything else ISN'T relevant, but I want confirmation of this and a reason why. Included in the Wiki would be best, I think.

  8. ...acquire .ISO images of original XP disks with accurate volume labels and make them available to people.

    Hmmm, this sure sounds illegal - you want to collect and distribute to people the XP operating system, with or without Microsoft's permission?

    What am I missing in this request, are you a licensed OEM, otherwise I would say you are looking to get yourself put in some hot water?

    There are a lot of misinformed people regarding the legality of the duplication and distribution of Microsoft software. Many people mistakenly believe that the copyright of the software is the equivalent of copyrighted printed material. It is not.

    When one purchases a legal copy of XP (or other MS software) one does not actually purchase the software; one purchases a License to use the software. The validity of the license is tied to the product key, and not the software itself. Meaning that, if you are legally licensed to use the software, you can acquire that software from any source. There is nothing illegal about sharing copies of (in my case) Windows XP. Circumventing the license mechanisms (activation, validation, volume licenses, etc...) is illegal. Simply copying and distributing the software is perfectly legal.

    None of the above, however, is on topic, and even if it were that is completely secondary. I am less concerned about my desire to help others fix their legally licensed systems by providing for them copies of the original data, and more concerned about the question regarding Product ID's. Given that you've made an issue of the least relevant question and ignored the most relevant (and most difficult), I assume it is because you are equally uninformed about Product ID's.

  9. Matching workable XP installation disks with broken machines is my interest. I don't know where else to put the topic, if it's better somewhere else, please move.

    On the wiki, it descrives the Microsoft Product Code (MPC) with the letters "XXXXX", and the Channel ID as "YYY". Then there's the "ZZZZ...." codes, and nothing is said about them.

    I'm looking at a registry entry right now on a machine that needs a Repair Install/In Place Upgrade. hklm\software\microsoft\windows nt\currentversion

    Has a registry entry "ProductID" as "555274-640-0426986-23489"

    I know that "555274" is the Product Code and "640" is the channel ID. What I want to know is what the remaining numbers are in the code (the "ZZZ..." numbers), what they are used for and should I incorporate them into the custom XP disk I am creating in order to do the Repair Installation.

    Also, I'm not sure what the wiki means when it says that the "640, 641, 642..." channel ID's are for volume licensing and that they are somehow "created" by the channel CID of 270.

    Here's the link:

    https://wiki.lunarsoft.net/wiki/Product_IDs

    And here's the quote:

    640 through 652 : Volume License (usually generated via 270 CID in setupp.ini)

    In general, what's the relationship between the codes in the setupp.ini file, and the registry entry: hklm\software\microsoft\windows nt\currentversion\ProductID ?

    I get the idea that only the MPC and CID are relevant, the volume label MIGHT be relevant which sort of implies that everything else ISN'T relevant, but I want confirmation of this and a reason why. Included in the Wiki would be best, I think.

    Also, to the issue of the need for matching the volume lables, I would like to participate in a group effort to acquire .ISO images of original XP disks with accurate volume labels and make them available to people. How this can be done, and if anyone else is willing to help is also what I would like to know.

×
×
  • Create New...