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Microsoft fixes Microsoft Update


James_A
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Good news, for those struggling to run Microsoft Update, since August.

I received this direct from Microsoft:-

Microsoft has received customer reports of reduced performance while checking for updates on Windows XP systems with restricted hardware configurations (typically less than 1 GB of RAM). The Windows Update team has investigated this issue and determined that this was caused by a small number of updates offered through Microsoft Update that contained detection logic that increased CPU and memory use, resulting in reduced system performance. We have addressed the issue with the detection logic. Even with this resolution, the next immediate scan of a system will still show the performance issue, since the detection logic is stored locally. However, after the next immediate scan the cache will be cleared and system performance will return to normal.

Some customers had observed that by disabling the opt-in to Microsoft Update (MU), performance issues were resolved. Microsoft does not recommend that customers disable MU opt-in, as you are no longer able to receive essential security updates for Microsoft products such as Office, Visual Studio, or Silverlight. We understand some customers were compelled to implement this workaround until a permanent solution was found. You can re-enable Microsoft Update at http://update.microsoft.com/microsoftupdate.

Microsoft also say:-

We sincerely apologize for disruption caused by this issue.

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I had a feeling they'd fix this quick.

I already re-enabled MS Update, as it happens. Turned it on as a test, the results of which were inconsistent; I got a hang but couldn't verify the source, so I went back to MS Update and scheduled a check for updates so I'd know when to look for it (which I should have done in the first place). At the appointed time there was no hang or slowdown at all. Now it makes sense. :dribble: Thanks.

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Even when the email comes straight from someone at Microsoft it still seems to be written in Microsoft-speak. :dribble:

Incidentally, see Long-time MSFT employee Raymond Chen's personal blog for some particilarly wierd examples of Micro-speak.

Translating the first post into plain English, it means you have to run Microsoft Update twice to get things back to normal.

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Translating the first post into plain English, it means you have to run Microsoft Update twice to get things back to normal.

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I thought they made that fairly clear...eventually, in a round-about fashion.

You'd think these guys were being paid by the word, they use 5 times as many as they need.

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