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Ultimate Predator

Thinking of Getting Wireless

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Where do I start? My PC doesn't have a wireless modem, and I know my internet speed is 512kbps (Tesco broadband), and thats it. I live in the UK. If people could guide me on what to do, and what to buy, I would really appreciate it.

Also, will wireless work with Linux (Ubuntu is what I'm thinking of).

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Definitely get a Linksys WRT54GL router.

Your PC would need a wireless network card, or you could use the ethernet connection if you're close enough to the router.

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And what are the principles involved. Is it hard to plug-in a network card? I thought its attached to the back of the PC, like USB? And the router provides the wireless connection? And what gets attached into there then? Just the phone line? I currently have a modem that my ISP provided us, and the phone line plugged into the PC providing the internet.

EDIT: Is this the router you were thinking of? And this works with Windows just fine? I'm not to worried about Linux, just interested. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Linksys-WRT54GL-UK...6015&sr=8-1

Would I still need a software firewall after this?

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DSL:

Phone line -> DSL modem -> Wireless Router -> NIC (Ethernet connection/Wireless card)

Cable Internet:

Cable line -> Cable Modem -> Wireless Router -> NIC

Not hard to install a NIC (Network Interface Card) at all. Just remove the side panel of your case and plug it into the PCI slot. Install drivers as needed.

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The above were examples. I have cable so I put the common setup for cable Internet.

Wikipedia has some interesting information on PCI slots.

If it says WRT54GL then it would be the correct router.

As for the wireless NIC, just find what suits your needs. Any G based card would work fine as it would utilize your router's G capabilities. There are many firmwares that support WPA2, so you would want to be sure your wireless NIC supports WPA2 as well, else you will have to use a lessen form of wireless protection such as WPA or even WEP.

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Graphics card, network card, sound card, TV card, etc are "Expansion cards".

You insert them into the computer by connecting them to the motherboard. Motherboard have buses/slots to which you connect the expansion cards to.

Modern motherboards have PCI-Express and PCI buses. Older motherboards have AGP and PCI buses, and very old computers have PCI and ISA buses.

If you have a network card in your computer, then it is most likely a PCI card.

If you want to get wireless, then you would buy a wireless network card for the computer and a wireless router for the wireless network card to communicate with.

The Linksys WRT54GL wireless router which Tarun mentioned is a good choice of a wireless router, its popular and have a good repuation.

Linux works with wireless network cards, but unfortunately wireless is as far as i know, a bit of a weakness in Linux because not all wireless network cards are supported, so you should check so that it really works with Linux before you buy it. Wireless support in Linux is expected to improve though, the 2.6.22 kernel have a new and improved wireless network stack, and since Dell started to sell computers with Ubuntu pre-installed, they are working with hardware vendors to get better device drivers to Linux.

The new Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) is expected to come in October. :hello:

I would not get wireless though, because already have wired network. I don't have a laptop, and the desktop computer is at a fixed position, its on the desktop and it stays there. Wireless have waves in the air, don't know how good that is. Wireless are slower, so transferring files inside the LAN would be slower (I have 100 mbit/s LAN, most wireless is like 54 or 11 mbit/s). I heard a lot that wireless is bad for gaming and has lags, kicks, etc. Less secure than wired network, and the encryption can be cracked.

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If you have a lot of Windows machines to be networked, I wouldn't put too much worry into a card that works with Linux unless you know for a fact that you'll stick with it.

Here's some basic Wireless Tips.

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The NIC would be better than using a USB device.

Why do you need a wireless network? How many computers are in your home that will be networked? Etc, etc. :hello:

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I've never been fond of USB devices for networking from previous experiences with them. They often wouldn't work well or at all.

As far as instructions, what sort do you need? Once you have your equipment, you just have to plug everything in. You log into the router and configure the settings, setting up WEP/WPA/WPA2 and TKIP/AES to secure your network. It's all really easy. :hello:

As far as firmware goes, I'm using Tomato firmware and I absolutely love it.

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Instructions for all. Setting up, no idea. Firmware for what?

I have no idea how to to put in a card. I know it sounds like I'm going on a lot, but if I can be sure that I can do it myself with step-by-step instructions, I'd save a lot of money.

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Let's just say it's a lot easier than you may think it is right now. Installing a card into your computer is as easy as removing the case, unscrewing a cover panel from the back inside and then pushing the card in and putting the screw back in to help hold it. It shouldn't take you very long at all. Maybe an hour tops, assuming that accessing the computer to install the card takes the longest.

As for the firmware. Linksys WRT54GL utilizes Linux which allows for third party firmwares to be loaded onto the router. Many of these firmwares expand the built in features and add much more functionality and flexibility. I'm sure Eldmannen can say a lot more about this. :hello:

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Well it depends on what computer will get the card. Is it one that will run a flavor of Linux?

If not, you'll want a G based card that can support WPA2 for maximum security.

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As for the firmware. Linksys WRT54GL utilizes Linux which allows for third party firmwares to be loaded onto the router. Many of these firmwares expand the built in features and add much more functionality and flexibility. I'm sure Eldmannen can say a lot more about this. :hello:

The fact that it runs Linux its possible to install a custom firmware has contributed to making the Linksys WRT54GL router very popular.

There are third-party firmware such as DD-WRT, OpenWrt, and others. DD-WRT and OpenWrt being the two most popular firmwares. It has Tarun said, expands features and functionality.

Well it depends on what computer will get the card. Is it one that will run a flavor of Linux?

If not, you'll want a G based card that can support WPA2 for maximum security.

If Linux, you would probably want a G based card that support WPA2 anyways. :D

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Try the Amazon UK link, or go out to a store and get it. It's not that difficult.

You have all the answers you need.

  • Linksys WRT54GL router
  • Linksys wireless Gcard that supports WPA2
  • You may need ethernet cable(s) of various lengths to connect the modem, router and computer that is not wireless.
  • Upgrade to Tomato firmware after you get the router installed.

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