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Need help setting up Ubuntu partition


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Ah yes, of course. Had trouble understanding how to install ubuntu on a seperate partition I had already made, and without a backup of my data, or a Windows installation DVD, I was worried and didn't do it in the end. One day I will though.

Or, I'll install Xubuntu just for awesome performance. Do you think it better?

Is gobuntu feasible to use?

What is the advantage of Kubuntu?

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Ah yes, of course. Had trouble understanding how to install ubuntu on a seperate partition I had already made, and without a backup of my data, or a Windows installation DVD, I was worried and didn't do it in the end. One day I will though.

Or, I'll install Xubuntu just for awesome performance. Do you think it better?

Is gobuntu feasible to use?

What is the advantage of Kubuntu?

Xubuntu is Ubuntu with the Xfce desktop environment, instead of the GNOME desktop environment that Ubuntu uses. Xfce is more light-weight, so its a better choice for slightly older computers. Xfce since its lighter, also is a bit faster, so you can choose it, for better desktop performance, but most people go with Ubuntu.

Kubuntu is Ubuntu with the KDE desktop environment, instead of the GNOME desktop environment that Ubuntu uses. Some prefer KDE over GNOME, thats why there is Kubuntu. KDE might have more settings, while GNOME is more simpler.

I don't know if Gobuntu is feasible, its a bit more hardcore. Not a good idea for a new user to directly jump on Gobuntu.

Most people go with Ubuntu, its the standard flavor of Ubuntu. So that is probably what you should go with too. You can run it from the LiveCD to play around with it, without installing it.

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Ah yes, of course. Had trouble understanding how to install ubuntu on a seperate partition I had already made, and without a backup of my data, or a Windows installation DVD, I was worried and didn't do it in the end. One day I will though.

Or, I'll install Xubuntu just for awesome performance. Do you think it better?

Is gobuntu feasible to use?

What is the advantage of Kubuntu?

Xubuntu is Ubuntu with the Xfce desktop environment, instead of the GNOME desktop environment that Ubuntu uses. Xfce is more light-weight, so its a better choice for slightly older computers. Xfce since its lighter, also is a bit faster, so you can choose it, for better desktop performance, but most people go with Ubuntu.

Kubuntu is Ubuntu with the KDE desktop environment, instead of the GNOME desktop environment that Ubuntu uses. Some prefer KDE over GNOME, thats why there is Kubuntu. KDE might have more settings, while GNOME is more simpler.

I don't know if Gobuntu is feasible, its a bit more hardcore. Not a good idea for a new user to directly jump on Gobuntu.

Most people go with Ubuntu, its the standard flavor of Ubuntu. So that is probably what you should go with too. You can run it from the LiveCD to play around with it, without installing it.

I see. It would be a hard choice betwene normal Ubuntu and Xubuntu. I wo't install it on this PC, I made a separate partition for it, and I couldn't find anywhere in the installer for me to select that partition for Ubuntu to install to.

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I see. It would be a hard choice betwene normal Ubuntu and Xubuntu. I wo't install it on this PC, I made a separate partition for it, and I couldn't find anywhere in the installer for me to select that partition for Ubuntu to install to.

If you have a modern computer, you should probably go with Ubuntu. It is the default flavor. .)

The installer does ask you to partition the disk.

The Ubuntu community have created a guide to guide you through the installation;

* https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Graphical...1d06d657ae5d6bf

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  • 2 weeks later...

I see. It would be a hard choice betwene normal Ubuntu and Xubuntu. I wo't install it on this PC, I made a separate partition for it, and I couldn't find anywhere in the installer for me to select that partition for Ubuntu to install to.

If you have a modern computer, you should probably go with Ubuntu. It is the default flavor. .)

The installer does ask you to partition the disk.

The Ubuntu community have created a guide to guide you through the installation;

* https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Graphical...1d06d657ae5d6bf

Thanks for the reply.

I'm going to sound annoying now, but I have looked through that guide, how do I select a partition that I have already made?

And how do I know it is the right partition as Ubuntu doesn't use letters.

Addi tonally, will this only install on that partition, and not format other partitions, as this image made me wonder.

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Thanks for the reply.

I'm going to sound annoying now, but I have looked through that guide, how do I select a partition that I have already made?

And how do I know it is the right partition as Ubuntu doesn't use letters.

Addi tonally, will this only install on that partition, and not format other partitions, as this image made me wonder.

/dev/hda or /dev/sda is the first disk. hdb or sdb is second disk, and hdc or sdc are third disk.

hd is for IDE/PATA. sd is for SCSI and SATA.

sda is first, sdb is second, sdc is third, sdd is fourth, etc.

Then letter are the partitions.

sda1, sda2, sda3, etc. But if you use extended partitions, then its sda1, sda5, sda6, etc. (This actually makes sense if you understand partitions, since only the first four partitions can be logical)

Windows usually only have one partition. Windows store the swap file on the system partition.

Linux usually have two partitions. One partition for the operating system, and another "swap partition" for swap data (direct raw access for swap, rather than to have to go through a file system). However, you choose not to use a swap partition. I have 4gb RAM so I disabled swap partition.

I guess you select the "Manually edit partition tables" option.

But if you don't have made any partition, you can just let the installer resize your current partitions.

What I did was that I bought another hard disk, unplugged the Windows disk, and installed Ubuntu with only the other disk attached to the computer.

This way, I get Windows and Ubuntu on completely separate disks, and no risk for anything to go wrong. Also I can backup my stuff from my Windows disk (disk 1), to my Ubuntu disk (disk 2), so if one of the disks would crash for some reason, then I still have backups. :)

sda1 = Windows XP

sda5 = Media

sda6 = Media

sdb1 = Ubuntu

sdb2 = Backup

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No worries.

Right, I have one harddrick on my laptop, which has 3 partitions, ACER - C: (for Windows, DATA - D: (for data), and DATA 2 - F: (for ubuntu). Ideally, I want to install ubuntu in the future to F:, which is currently just under 15 GIG in space.

A step by step guide owuld be great, though I can wait till I get a disk through for the latest release, and then write down all the stuff it says when I select manual partition. I would really appreciate this.

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