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Outpost Firewall Pro 2009 Offer


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Outpost Firewall Pro 2009 Offer

License: Shareware

File Size: 32-bit 23.7 MB, 64- bit 16.8 MB

Operating Systems: 32- and 64-bit Windows (Vista, XP, Server 2003, 2008), Windows 2000 (SP3 and above).

HomePage: http://www.agnitum.com/products/outpost/download.php

Special Offer

I heard about this terrific offer from one of their beta testers at Wilders. Its a Lifetime key for up to 3 Computers for the price of a one year key. so I felt it may be of interest to some of our members and guest here at the forum.

Here is the Link, http://www.agnitum.com/lp/lifetime_for_1year_price_2008.php

This offer is also extended to Agnitum’s Outpost Security Suite

Features

Advanced firewall for secure connections

Antispyware to keep your PC spyware-free

Host protection to block zero-day threats

Web control to protect your PC from web-borne threats

Benefits

Safety on the Internet

The two-way firewall stops inappropriate or malicious access to your computer from both internal (LAN) and external (Internet) sources. As a frontline defense, it prevents malware from spreading or “phoning home”, providing protection against hackers, loss of personal data, unknown malware, and unauthorized program activity.

Preemptive threat protection

Outpost’s Host Protection module monitors how programs interact to protect your system against high-level security breaches and has passed all well-known leaktests to prevent unauthorized transmission of information from your PC.

No more spyware!

Eliminate spyware with Outpost’s dedicated antispyware utility. Regular updates and always-on monitoring ensure that spyware cannot activate and cause damage to your data or divert your applications.

Secure web surfing

The versatile Web Control module safeguards you against the Internet’s darker side. It steers you away from websites infected with drive-by downloads, prevents the inadvertent disclosure of personal information, limits your exposure to potentially unsafe web properties, and keeps your identity private.

Bulletproof self-defense

Outpost cannot be deactivated by targeted attacks, ensuring continuity of protection.

Performance-driven operation

No matter what you do on an Outpost-protected computer, it will always feel like it’s brand new because the program uses so few system resources. The key engine has been optimized to deliver revolutionary speed efficiency, so you can focus on using your computer productively, not worrying about security issues.

Power without complexity

Whether you’re a security novice or expert, you can easily configure Outpost Firewall Pro to meet your needs. Thanks to automated and context-sensitive help, the firewall can learn how to handle alerts and make decisions for you, so you can focus on what you want to do, and leave the security to Outpost!

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I can see why Tarun you liked it.I have trial version installed so far no bog down of system , hey this thing is rock solid beautiful GUI. I'llleave in for awhile seee if it causes any hangups of PC or causes excessive popups program weights in at a little more then 43MB.

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I can see why Tarun you liked it.I have trial version installed so far no bog down of system , hey this thing is rock solid beautiful GUI. I'llleave in for awhile seee if it causes any hangups of PC or causes excessive popups program weights in at a little more then 43MB.

I think 43 mb is pretty much.

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I can see why Tarun you liked it.I have trial version installed so far no bog down of system , hey this thing is rock solid beautiful GUI. I'llleave in for awhile seee if it causes any hangups of PC or causes excessive popups program weights in at a little more then 43MB.

I think 43 mb is pretty much.

its close to average size considering its more then just firewall same as Comodo and Online Armor paid version all in the 36 to 46MB range.but the thing is light on resource I have it a installed running in the area of 3,600kb to 5,400 or so kb of memory unless your doing a spyware scan its using about 8,600kb to maybe 10,000kb and its not driving me crazy with prompts I have had none. On install it does an indepth scan of whats in pc before finial initialization. the download is not one, two ,three it really looks over your system well and in detail. It's GUI is much better looking then either Comodo or Online Armor and very easy to navigate. The lifetime license for 3pc That a onetime fee if anyone can swing it its well worth ita good investment if you can afford it.

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Well my firewall is iptables and it uses virtually no resources at all. The package is 1618 kb to download, the executable is 55kb and it uses about 0 kb of RAM.

How?

Well, at system start it runs a process that loads a configuration file with filtering rules and passes them to the Netfilter framework in the kernel, after that, the process exits and does not run anymore.

It is advanced too. It is does stateful packet filtering, routing, network address translation (DNAT, SNAT). Filtering on input, output, forward chains. Multiple network interfaces. Connection tracking, packet dropping/rejection/logging. Rules that allow you to match packages by fields in the IP and TCP, UDP, ICMP header - yeah, TTL, ToS, source/destination port, flags, protocol, syn/ack/rst/urg/psh/fin, state, etc. Prerouting, postrouting, packet mangling, etc. Rules can be triggered on a package per second basis, etc.

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that sounds like a real fine firewall, too bad it is only available to linux users. :lol: "as he gently weeps "

Yeah, it is a good firewall. Not only Linux have a good firewall though.

The *BSD operating systems have a good firewall too, called PF.

I just saw wipfw a Windows firewall based on the ipfw firewall from FreeBSD.

It sounds interesting, although it haven't been updated in 2 years.

When a company develop a commercial firewall for Windows the clueless middle-management PHB (pointy-haired boss) comes in and says: "Okay listen up, this is how we do. We need brand-awareness; put a shortcut in the start-menu, a shortcut in the QuickLaunch toolbar, and a shortcut on the desktop. The marketing department have told us we need brand-awareness to make our application distinct from our competitors, so slap together some iffy skin on it so it looks cool. Have it always stay resident in the systray, and make sure it blinks or popups a lot so the customer reminds that it protects him, and remind him that he gets value for his money. Oh and display a splash screen that lasts for at least 5 seconds every time the computer boots. Oh, and lets do the unininstaller Norton-style, so that the customer cant uninstall it. Put a link to our website in their browser's bookmarks, and make our website their startpage. Make a crippled 30-day trial version that nags the hell out of the user to buy it, and get people to download it by using scaremongering banners that say 'Warning your computer is infected, click here to protect it!' all over teh internets. Give the application a cool name like Super Professional Ultimate Turbo Deluxe edition or something, and make different editions with different feature sets, some more crippled than others. Append the next year, such as 2009 to the software title, this will make our customers upgrade every year since nobody wants to be stuck with last years stuff."

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that sounds like a real fine firewall, too bad it is only available to linux users. :lol: "as he gently weeps "

Yeah, it is a good firewall. Not only Linux have a good firewall though.

The *BSD operating systems have a good firewall too, called PF.

I just saw wipfw a Windows firewall based on the ipfw firewall from FreeBSD.

It sounds interesting, although it haven't been updated in 2 years.

When a company develop a commercial firewall for Windows the clueless middle-management PHB (pointy-haired boss) comes in and says: "Okay listen up, this is how we do. We need brand-awareness; put a shortcut in the start-menu, a shortcut in the QuickLaunch toolbar, and a shortcut on the desktop. The marketing department have told us we need brand-awareness to make our application distinct from our competitors, so slap together some iffy skin on it so it looks cool. Have it always stay resident in the systray, and make sure it blinks or popups a lot so the customer reminds that it protects him, and remind him that he gets value for his money. Oh and display a splash screen that lasts for at least 5 seconds every time the computer boots. Oh, and lets do the unininstaller Norton-style, so that the customer cant uninstall it. Put a link to our website in their browser's bookmarks, and make our website their startpage. Make a crippled 30-day trial version that nags the hell out of the user to buy it, and get people to download it by using scaremongering banners that say 'Warning your computer is infected, click here to protect it!' all over teh internets. Give the application a cool name like Super Professional Ultimate Turbo Deluxe edition or something, and make different editions with different feature sets, some more crippled than others. Append the next year, such as 2009 to the software title, this will make our customers upgrade every year since nobody wants to be stuck with last years stuff."

Oh so true. But stuff like you describe, surely uou need some GUI in order to select which processes should be allowed or blocked and so forth? I mean, Comodo isn't half bad.

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Oh so true. But stuff like you describe, surely uou need some GUI in order to select which processes should be allowed or blocked and so forth? I mean, Comodo isn't half bad.

Well, it depends on how you define a "firewall".

Packet filtering, blocking applications that try use the network, intrusion-detection system, etc.

Many personal firewalls block application that try to use the network, but hardware firewalls and firewalls built into routers don't (and can't) do that.

A GUI would indeed be very useful for allowing/canceling requests for applications to access the network.

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A GUI would indeed be very useful for allowing/canceling requests for applications to access the network.

Do you have that with your firewall? Surely you need one?

No, my firewall just does packet filtering.

I am sure I could install something that filters based on application if I wanted though.

I don't feel like I need one though, I only run things which is fairly trusted.

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A GUI would indeed be very useful for allowing/canceling requests for applications to access the network.

Do you have that with your firewall? Surely you need one?

No, my firewall just does packet filtering.

I am sure I could install something that filters based on application if I wanted though.

I don't feel like I need one though, I only run things which is fairly trusted.

As a linux user, you're probably right, but I think as a Windows user you need one.

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As a linux user, you're probably right, but I think as a Windows user you need one.

Well, I guess it depends on the type of user, how you use the computer, and how security minded you are.

I got away pretty well using Windows with no antivirus software and just the default firewall included in SP2.

Some people will manage to "mess" things up, no matter how hard you try to secure the systems. The system administrator lets passwords expire after some time, or force user passwords to contain both letters and numbers, and the user writes the password on a yellow post-it note and attaches it to the monitor. Some users insist on opening every email attachment they get, an gladly send money to the prince of Nigeria because he needs their help. Some people will open files named britney_spears_nude.jpg.exe, some people will open files with a .com extension, thinking its a website. Some users will insist on clicking banners that says "Congratulations, you're the 100th million visitor, you've won $10000, click here to claim your prize!". Some people will insist on pornsurfing using Internet Explorer, clicking Yes on every dialog, and installing every browser toolbar they can find. Some people will expect a 50kb .exe file to be a full-length movie in HD.

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As a linux user, you're probably right, but I think as a Windows user you need one.

Well, I guess it depends on the type of user, how you use the computer, and how security minded you are.

I got away pretty well using Windows with no antivirus software and just the default firewall included in SP2.

Some people will manage to "mess" things up, no matter how hard you try to secure the systems. The system administrator lets passwords expire after some time, or force user passwords to contain both letters and numbers, and the user writes the password on a yellow post-it note and attaches it to the monitor. Some users insist on opening every email attachment they get, an gladly send money to the prince of Nigeria because he needs their help. Some people will open files named britney_spears_nude.jpg.exe, some people will open files with a .com extension, thinking its a website. Some users will insist on clicking banners that says "Congratulations, you're the 100th million visitor, you've won $10000, click here to claim your prize!". Some people will insist on pornsurfing using Internet Explorer, clicking Yes on every dialog, and installing every browser toolbar they can find. Some people will expect a 50kb .exe file to be a full-length movie in HD.

True. true. but I like to know whats going in and out of PC and whats trying to connect to the internet and what's not TBH, and I'd want that on Window's or Linux?

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True. true. but I like to know whats going in and out of PC and whats trying to connect to the internet and what's not TBH, and I'd want that on Window's or Linux?

Yeah, it kind of nice to be able to know what is going in and out of the system. That stuff is good to know.

I am not sure what your question is though, perhaps its poorly stated.

Its up to you if you want it or not, I suppose you can have it on both Windows and Linux if you want.

Someone security-minded might like to have network access filtered by application, but then again, someone security-minded is the type of person who is least likely to actually need it. :lol:

I suppose its less of need to have limit applications from accessing the network if you run Linux, especially if you get all your software from the official repository and only use open-source software.

I think that the more you get software from third-party/unofficial sources or use closed-source software, the need to limit applications from accessing the network increases.

A large part of the Linux and open source community are technologically adept users who are rigid and value freedom, privacy and security. They are harsh and are much less likely to let poop like advertisement, phone-home, and stuff like that fly.

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True. true. but I like to know whats going in and out of PC and whats trying to connect to the internet and what's not TBH, and I'd want that on Window's or Linux?

Yeah, it kind of nice to be able to know what is going in and out of the system. That stuff is good to know.

I am not sure what your question is though, perhaps its poorly stated.

Its up to you if you want it or not, I suppose you can have it on both Windows and Linux if you want.

Someone security-minded might like to have network access filtered by application, but then again, someone security-minded is the type of person who is least likely to actually need it. :lol:

I suppose its less of need to have limit applications from accessing the network if you run Linux, especially if you get all your software from the official repository and only use open-source software.

I think that the more you get software from third-party/unofficial sources or use closed-source software, the need to limit applications from accessing the network increases.

A large part of the Linux and open source community are technologically adept users who are rigid and value freedom, privacy and security. They are harsh and are much less likely to let poop like advertisement, phone-home, and stuff like that fly.

I dind't mean to add a question mark. I know what you mean, but still, I'd want to know, not rely on someone else.

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I dind't mean to add a question mark. I know what you mean, but still, I'd want to know, not rely on someone else.

Yeah, it is always good to be independent and not have to rely on someone else.

Then how come you don't have that option?

Well, on Windows, I use the built-in firewall, because thats whats there.

If I installed another firewall, then I would need to find another world, and it would be another process running.

I am not really worried, so the default firewall in SP2 will do.

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